Can a DWI be Dismissed in Texas?

Many Texans want to know if you can successfully defend against a DWI charge.

The answer is, you can, but probably not without hiring a DUI attorney.

Chances of Dismissal

First and foremost, you need to hire an experienced, qualified DWI attorney as early as possible in your case.

An attorney can examine the facts surrounding your case and your arrest.

An attorney that specializes in defending against DWI charges can readily discern the weak points in the State’s case and begin planning how to mount a strong defense.

Your attorney can also help you request, and subsequently defend you at, an “ALR Hearing.” When you are charged with a DWI, you often face two cases. Read more

What are the Texas Open Container Laws?

Nearly every Texan has heard of, and knows a bit about, Texas’s “Open Container” laws. Below we will take a look at the Open Container laws and discuss some potential penalties.

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The “Open Container” Law

Section 49.031(b) of the Texas Penal Code codifies the charge of “Possession of Alcoholic Beverages in a Motor Vehicle.” This is Texas’s Open Container law. Read more

What’s the Difference between DWI and DUI in Texas?

A common source of confusion in Texas is the difference between a DWI and a DUI.

Texans often use the two terms interchangeably. However, the two offenses are largely dissimilar. Below we will take a look at how the two offenses differ.

What is a DWI?

Driving While Intoxicated, or “DWI” for short, is a criminal offense charged under the Texas Penal Code.

An offender can be charged with a DWI if she or he has a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher or appears readily intoxicated.

Of the two charges, a DWI is a much graver offense.

DWI convictions can lead to hefty fines, driver’s license suspension, and/or a jail or prison sentence.

1st DWI Fine

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Texas ALR Hearings for Drunk Driving

Most Texans do not realize that if you refuse to take a breath or blood alcohol test in Texas, the Texas Department of Public Safety (“DPS”) can automatically revoke your driver’s license.

If you refused a test and were arrested for a DWI, you typically find yourself facing two separate cases: the criminal DWI case the State is bringing and the Administrative License Revocation (ALR) case brought brought by the DPS.

What happens at an ALR Hearing in Dallas, Texas?

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